Auditory therapy of A. Tomatis (part 3)
Motor skill The vestibule, which is part of the inner ear, is responsible for the balance, coordination and position of the body. These signs will help to identify the presence…

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Auditory therapy of A. Tomatis (part 3)
Motor skill The vestibule, which is part of the inner ear, is responsible for the balance, coordination and position of the body. These signs will help to identify the presence…

Continue reading →

Axis of blood from noise to folk
Blood Axis is a band that is unique in many ways. For most of their career, they have had exactly one Studio album at heart – absolutely nothing like their…

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brain scanner

Music therapy (part 2)

I owe my art to the fact that I did not commit suicide.

Oh, people, if you ever read this, you will remember that you have been unjust to me; let the unfortunate be comforted by seeing a fellow-sufferer who, in spite of all the opposition of nature, has done everything in his power to become a worthy artist and man.

Goodbye and don’t forget me at all. Be happy.

Ludwig Beethoven. Heiligenstadt, 1801.” Continue reading

Wave of consciousness

Beta waves are the fastest. Their frequency varies, in the classical version, from 14 to 42 Hz (and according to some modern sources – more than 100 Hz). In the normal waking state, when we observe the world around us with our eyes open, or are focused on solving some current problems, these waves, mainly in the range of 14 to 40 Hertz, dominate our brain. Beta waves are usually associated with wakefulness, wakefulness, concentration, cognition, and, if they are abundant, with anxiety, fear, and panic. The lack of beta waves is associated with depression, poor selective attention and problems with storing information. Continue reading

The brain is “under jazz»

When jazz musicians improvise, their brains switch off the areas responsible for self-censorship and inhibition of nerve impulses, and instead turn on the areas that open the way for self-expression.

A related study conducted at Johns Hopkins University, which involved volunteer musicians from the Peabody Institute, and which used the method of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), shed light on the mechanism of creative improvisation that artists use in everyday life.

Jazz musicians improvise and create their own unique riffs by turning off the brakes and turning on creativity. Continue reading

Genetic codes and music
Nigel Helyer from the University of Western Australia (Univesrity of Western Australia) and the University laboratory SymbioticA created the project GeneMusiK, which turns genetic codes into musical works and Vice…

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Should you be Einstein?
You're young, you think you're advanced, Nightclubs are the best place to hang out after school or work. After the feeling of well spent time, but that's fresh and clear…

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Fifty shades of the dark middle ages
No, to be honest, the title is a bit tricky: we will give not fifty examples, but much less, but – nevertheless. The middle ages have always attracted musicians –…

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Mozart effect (part 4)
A typical case occurred with a patient of the North Italian hospital. Patient E. all her 68 years of life spoke her native North Italian Veronese dialect, very different from…

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