Auditory therapy of A. Tomatis (part 4)
Why Mozart? But why Mozart? Why not Bach, Beethoven, the Beatles? Mozart did not create the stunning effects that Bach's mathematical genius was capable of. His music does not stir…

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Music and health (part 2)
Russian writer F. M. Dostoevsky told how in 1848 the composer Mikhail Ivanovich Glinka visited the Society of lovers of literature. He then played Chopin, Gluck and his own compositions.…

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Huge frequency power
Hard rock sucks energy not only from a person, but also, for example, from geraniums. Since the time of Luther Burbank it is known that music and sounds can affect…

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brain scanner

Music therapy (part 2)

I owe my art to the fact that I did not commit suicide.

Oh, people, if you ever read this, you will remember that you have been unjust to me; let the unfortunate be comforted by seeing a fellow-sufferer who, in spite of all the opposition of nature, has done everything in his power to become a worthy artist and man.

Goodbye and don’t forget me at all. Be happy.

Ludwig Beethoven. Heiligenstadt, 1801.” Continue reading

Wave of consciousness

Beta waves are the fastest. Their frequency varies, in the classical version, from 14 to 42 Hz (and according to some modern sources – more than 100 Hz). In the normal waking state, when we observe the world around us with our eyes open, or are focused on solving some current problems, these waves, mainly in the range of 14 to 40 Hertz, dominate our brain. Beta waves are usually associated with wakefulness, wakefulness, concentration, cognition, and, if they are abundant, with anxiety, fear, and panic. The lack of beta waves is associated with depression, poor selective attention and problems with storing information. Continue reading

The brain is “under jazz»

When jazz musicians improvise, their brains switch off the areas responsible for self-censorship and inhibition of nerve impulses, and instead turn on the areas that open the way for self-expression.

A related study conducted at Johns Hopkins University, which involved volunteer musicians from the Peabody Institute, and which used the method of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), shed light on the mechanism of creative improvisation that artists use in everyday life.

Jazz musicians improvise and create their own unique riffs by turning off the brakes and turning on creativity. Continue reading

Auditory therapy of A. Tomatis (part 1)
About 40 years ago, the French otolaryngologist Alfred Tomatis made some amazing discoveries that gave impetus to the development of the method of Tomatis. This method has different names: "auditory…

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Auditory therapy of A. Tomatis (part 3)
Program of hearing Training in listening is carried out by using sound effects, which is generated by a special electronic device. To change the function of the hearing, intensive intervention…

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Auditory therapy of A. Tomatis (part 1)
About 40 years ago, the French otolaryngologist Alfred Tomatis made some amazing discoveries that gave impetus to the development of the method of Tomatis. This method has different names: "auditory…

...

Myths about language (part 1)
Language barrier... It sounds like a diagnosis of intractable disease, functional dumbness, forcing a person who just glibly chattered in his native language, painfully stutter, "becat" and "mekat", and even…

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