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Tell me honestly, what do you associate the words "Italian music"with? Opera? Well, most likely, dissemble. Disco? That's more likely. Nevertheless, a significant part of the Italian musicians can in…

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How the Tomatis method accelerates learning foreign languages
On March 25, 1957, the French Academy of Sciences listened to an intriguing speech. They heard about the discoveries of a young specialist-otolaryngologist Alfred A. Tomatis. He discovered laws that…

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Mozart effect (part 2)
To test their assumptions Rauscher put a special experiment on rats, which is obviously not an emotional reaction to the music. A group of 30 rats was placed in a…

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brad Marshall

Music therapy (part 2)

I owe my art to the fact that I did not commit suicide.

Oh, people, if you ever read this, you will remember that you have been unjust to me; let the unfortunate be comforted by seeing a fellow-sufferer who, in spite of all the opposition of nature, has done everything in his power to become a worthy artist and man.

Goodbye and don’t forget me at all. Be happy.

Ludwig Beethoven. Heiligenstadt, 1801.” Continue reading

Sounds that are not

Let’s listen to a tape of spiritual music — Tibetan monks or Gregorian singing. If you listen, you can hear the voices merge, forming one pulsating tone.

This is one of the most interesting effects peculiar to some musical instruments and chorus of people singing in about one key — the formation of beats . When voices or instruments converge in unison, the beats slow, and when they diverge — they accelerate. Continue reading

Myths about language (part 1)

Language barrier… It sounds like a diagnosis of intractable disease, functional dumbness, forcing a person who just glibly chattered in his native language, painfully stutter, “becat” and “mekat”, and even just silent as a fish, as soon as you have to say a few phrases in a foreign language.

Is it possible to get rid of it? Of course, but for this, as in the treatment of any disease, it is necessary to understand its causes, as doctors say, “etiology”.

The easiest way, of course, to blame bad teachers, unimportant textbooks, yourself – for the “inability” to languages, etc. Continue reading

Auditory therapy of A. Tomatis (part 3)
Motor skill The vestibule, which is part of the inner ear, is responsible for the balance, coordination and position of the body. These signs will help to identify the presence…

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Chinese musical instrument
For some reason, Chinese music, even popular, eludes the European listener. People are frightened by strange symbols instead of the usual Latin or Cyrillic, a strange incomprehensible language and a…

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Mozart effect (part 2)
To test their assumptions Rauscher put a special experiment on rats, which is obviously not an emotional reaction to the music. A group of 30 rats was placed in a…

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Auditory therapy of A. Tomatis (part 4)
Why Mozart? But why Mozart? Why not Bach, Beethoven, the Beatles? Mozart did not create the stunning effects that Bach's mathematical genius was capable of. His music does not stir…

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