Myths about language (part 2)
For all kinds of "inability" to foreign languages often is either a lack of knowledge of the native and – I'm not afraid of the word – dislike for him,…

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Music and health (part 1)
I was walking along a quiet, old Moscow street one day and heard the wonderful sounds of Chopin from the window. Marvelled. After all, this house is a Russian research…

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Linguistic revival
A foreign language is much more than just new words. We also need to learn in which cases to use certain words, what should be highlighted, in what rhythm to…

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appropriate emotional reaction

History Of Neurophon

The first Neurophon was made when Patrick was only 14 years old, in 1958. The following year, Flanagan gave a lecture at the Houston Amateur Radio Club, where he demonstrated the possibilities of his invention.

The day after the lecture, a reporter from the Houston Post called him. He asked if it was possible to try a Neurophon on his relative who was deaf as a result of spinal meningitis. The experiment was very successful. And the day after the successful experiment, an article was published about the neurophone as a potential hearing aid for the deaf.

Fame grew every year. In 1961, correspondents from Life magazine literally settled in Patrick’s house. They took about a thousand pictures, following him everywhere he went. Continue reading

Musically gifted brain

Just as short-term learning increases the number of neurons that respond to sound, long-term learning increases the responses of nerve cells and even causes physical changes in the brain. Brain reactions of professional musicians differ significantly from those of non-musicians, and some areas of their brain are over-developed.

In 1998, Christo Pantev (Christo Pantev) from the University of münster in Germany showed that when musicians listen to piano playing, the area of auditory zones reacting to music, they have 25% more than non-musicians. Studies of children also confirm the assumption that early musical experience facilitates the “musical” development of the brain. In 2004 Antoine Shahin (Shahin Antoine), Larry Roberts (Larry E. Roberts) and Laurel Trainor (Laurel J. Trainor) from McMaster University in Ontario recorded the reaction of the brain 4-5 year old children to the sounds of piano, violin and pure tones. Continue reading

Auditory therapy of A. Tomatis (part 4)
Why Mozart? But why Mozart? Why not Bach, Beethoven, the Beatles? Mozart did not create the stunning effects that Bach's mathematical genius was capable of. His music does not stir…

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In healthy skin - healthy hearing (part 2)
Why is it necessary? All sounds stimulate the delicate bones located in the middle ear. Sometimes, when the eardrum is damaged, the bones of the middle ear can be stimulated…

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History Of Neurophon
The first Neurophon was made when Patrick was only 14 years old, in 1958. The following year, Flanagan gave a lecture at the Houston Amateur Radio Club, where he demonstrated…

...

2018: what happened to the ear
To sum up the musical results of the year – every time the lesson is not for the faint of heart. Certain things can be said at once, without looking…

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