Chinese musical instrument
For some reason, Chinese music, even popular, eludes the European listener. People are frightened by strange symbols instead of the usual Latin or Cyrillic, a strange incomprehensible language and a…

Continue reading →

Mozart effect (part 2)
To test their assumptions Rauscher put a special experiment on rats, which is obviously not an emotional reaction to the music. A group of 30 rats was placed in a…

Continue reading →

Genetic codes and music
Nigel Helyer from the University of Western Australia (Univesrity of Western Australia) and the University laboratory SymbioticA created the project GeneMusiK, which turns genetic codes into musical works and Vice…

Continue reading →

Sounds that are not

Let’s listen to a tape of spiritual music — Tibetan monks or Gregorian singing. If you listen, you can hear the voices merge, forming one pulsating tone.

This is one of the most interesting effects peculiar to some musical instruments and chorus of people singing in about one key — the formation of beats . When voices or instruments converge in unison, the beats slow, and when they diverge — they accelerate.

Perhaps this effect would have remained in the sphere of interests of musicians, if not a researcher Robert Monroe. He realized that despite the wide popularity in the scientific world of the effect of beats, no one investigated their impact on the human condition when listening through stereo headphones. Monroe discovered that when listening to sounds of close frequency on different channels (right and left), a person feels the so-called binaural beats, or binaural beats.

For example, when one ear hears a pure tone at 330 vibrations per second, and the other is a pure tone at 335 vibrations per second, the hemispheres of the human brain begin to work together, and as a result it “hears” beats at a frequency of 335 – 330 = 5 oscillations per second, but this is not a real external sound, but a “phantom”. It is born in the human brain only when a combination of electromagnetic waves coming from two synchronously working hemispheres of the brain.

“I always liked to ask and learn something new. However, until I entered high school, I never enjoyed studying and did not have much success in it. There was a time when I was on the verge of academic failure, when even satisfactory grades were given with difficulty. And this despite the fact that as a child I was called a smart child, which, in theory, should learn perfectly. The reason for my failures adults, as always, considered lack of diligence. I, disappointing them, was more and more desperate myself.

As an adult, I continued my studies in College, where I also did not Shine. When I fail, I retake it for as long as did not receive my desired grades. When I entered high school, I realized that I needed a new strategy, because there was no possibility to retake the exams endlessly. I could no longer work so hard for such mediocre results, so I turned my despair to the search for this new strategy.

Fortunately, I found it — I managed to overcome my “inability” to learn with binaural beats and dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) – a component found in seafood.

As a result, the academic work of Sisyphus turned into exquisite entertainment, which resulted in excellent marks and transformation of me as a person. I felt like I was out of a life sentence.»

This introduction begins one of his articles Richard Kennerly — an American scientist who studied the impact on the mental performance of a person listening to special combinations of sound vibrations, called binaural beats.

Thus, one of the most effective ways of organizing bioelectric brain oscillations (and related psychophysiological States), simultaneously providing high synchronization of both hemispheres, are binaural beats. What happens in the brain when a person “hears” these sounds.

In the 50s, the method of electroencephalography (EEG) was developed, which allows recording and studying the bioelectric potentials of the brain. At the same time, it was found that the frequency of bioelectric oscillations of the brain can be synchronized, under certain conditions, with different rhythmic stimuli, for example, pulses over a weak electric current, light flashes and sound clicks, if the frequency of the stimuli is within the natural frequency range of the bioelectric potentials of the brain.

The easiest way the brain follows the stimuli in the frequency range 8-25Hz, but in training, this interval can be extended to the entire range of natural frequencies of the brain.

Currently, it is customary to distinguish four main types of electrical oscillations in the human brain, each of which corresponds to its frequency range and the state of consciousness in which it dominates.

Wave of consciousness
Beta waves are the fastest. Their frequency varies, in the classical version, from 14 to 42 Hz (and according to some modern sources - more than 100 Hz). In the…

...

Musically gifted brain
Just as short-term learning increases the number of neurons that respond to sound, long-term learning increases the responses of nerve cells and even causes physical changes in the brain. Brain…

...

History Of Neurophon
The first Neurophon was made when Patrick was only 14 years old, in 1958. The following year, Flanagan gave a lecture at the Houston Amateur Radio Club, where he demonstrated…

...

How the Tomatis method accelerates learning foreign languages
On March 25, 1957, the French Academy of Sciences listened to an intriguing speech. They heard about the discoveries of a young specialist-otolaryngologist Alfred A. Tomatis. He discovered laws that…

...