Auditory therapy of A. Tomatis (part 1)
About 40 years ago, the French otolaryngologist Alfred Tomatis made some amazing discoveries that gave impetus to the development of the method of Tomatis. This method has different names: "auditory…

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Music and health (part 1)
I was walking along a quiet, old Moscow street one day and heard the wonderful sounds of Chopin from the window. Marvelled. After all, this house is a Russian research…

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Auditory therapy of A. Tomatis (part 3)
Program of hearing Training in listening is carried out by using sound effects, which is generated by a special electronic device. To change the function of the hearing, intensive intervention…

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ultrasonic

In healthy skin – healthy hearing (part 1)

The theory States that the brain uses a holographic coding system, so it is able to encode sensory signals through all the senses. Therefore, any stimulus, such as sound, for example, can be transmitted through any other sense organ, so that the brain can recognize the incoming signal as sound, using a special type of signal code for sound.

It seems, unwittingly, a significant contribution to the confirmation of this theory made Patrick Flanagan (Patrick Flanagan), when as a teenager invented a device that allows anyone (even completely deaf, even with remote surgically middle ear and, moreover, even with a completely atrophied auditory nerve) to hear through the skin. Patrick called his device – “Neurophone” (Neurophone). Entertaining history of neurophone. Continue reading

The sounds that feed the brain with energy
"Some sounds work just as well as a couple of cups of coffee," says Alfred Tomatis, an outstanding French expert in the field of hearing. This means that we can…

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Mozart effect (part 3)
The study of the Mozart effect on children and other experiments on the effect on the development of the child's brain gave impetus to the widespread dissemination in American society…

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Fifty shades of the dark middle ages
No, to be honest, the title is a bit tricky: we will give not fifty examples, but much less, but – nevertheless. The middle ages have always attracted musicians –…

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The brain is "under jazz»
When jazz musicians improvise, their brains switch off the areas responsible for self-censorship and inhibition of nerve impulses, and instead turn on the areas that open the way for self-expression.…

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