Auditory therapy of A. Tomatis (part 1)
About 40 years ago, the French otolaryngologist Alfred Tomatis made some amazing discoveries that gave impetus to the development of the method of Tomatis. This method has different names: "auditory…

Continue reading →

Auditory therapy of A. Tomatis (part 2)
The function of hearing Hearing, not hearing, is the primary function of the ear. Tomatis draws a clear line between hearing and hearing. Hearing is a passive process; listening is…

Continue reading →

Loud music and the reaction of drivers
Listening to music at high volume while driving can worsen reactions and lead to a traffic accident. This conclusion was made by canadian scientists. Their research showed that it takes…

Continue reading →

records

Loud music and the reaction of drivers

Listening to music at high volume while driving can worsen reactions and lead to a traffic accident. This conclusion was made by canadian scientists.

Their research showed that it takes about 20% more time to perform physical and mental exercises with loud music.

The British Royal automobile club (RAC) warned that if the reaction time of drivers is so reduced, they can get into a fatal accident.

According to RAC Executive Director Edmund king, this study shows that “loud music not only causes inconvenience to others, but can also lead to accidents.” Continue reading

Auditory therapy of A. Tomatis (part 3)
Motor skill The vestibule, which is part of the inner ear, is responsible for the balance, coordination and position of the body. These signs will help to identify the presence…

...

Fifty shades of the dark middle ages
No, to be honest, the title is a bit tricky: we will give not fifty examples, but much less, but – nevertheless. The middle ages have always attracted musicians –…

...

Psychosomatic reactions to some types of musical art
Music at all times, since its inception, has been used as a means of influencing people's minds. With its help, different goals were achieved. Knowledgeable people with a mind suited…

...

The brain is "under jazz»
When jazz musicians improvise, their brains switch off the areas responsible for self-censorship and inhibition of nerve impulses, and instead turn on the areas that open the way for self-expression.…

...