2018: what happened to the ear
To sum up the musical results of the year – every time the lesson is not for the faint of heart. Certain things can be said at once, without looking…

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Music and health (part 1)
I was walking along a quiet, old Moscow street one day and heard the wonderful sounds of Chopin from the window. Marvelled. After all, this house is a Russian research…

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At the limit of hearing possibilities
French otolaryngologist Alfred Tomatis was the first to systematically investigate the influence of high-frequency sounds on the human psyche. According to his theory, the child, floating in amniotic fluid during…

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imaging

The brain is “under jazz»

When jazz musicians improvise, their brains switch off the areas responsible for self-censorship and inhibition of nerve impulses, and instead turn on the areas that open the way for self-expression.

A related study conducted at Johns Hopkins University, which involved volunteer musicians from the Peabody Institute, and which used the method of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), shed light on the mechanism of creative improvisation that artists use in everyday life.

Jazz musicians improvise and create their own unique riffs by turning off the brakes and turning on creativity. Continue reading

How the Tomatis method accelerates learning foreign languages
On March 25, 1957, the French Academy of Sciences listened to an intriguing speech. They heard about the discoveries of a young specialist-otolaryngologist Alfred A. Tomatis. He discovered laws that…

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Amore... industrial
Tell me honestly, what do you associate the words "Italian music"with? Opera? Well, most likely, dissemble. Disco? That's more likely. Nevertheless, a significant part of the Italian musicians can in…

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Mozart effect (part 2)
To test their assumptions Rauscher put a special experiment on rats, which is obviously not an emotional reaction to the music. A group of 30 rats was placed in a…

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Chinese musical instrument
For some reason, Chinese music, even popular, eludes the European listener. People are frightened by strange symbols instead of the usual Latin or Cyrillic, a strange incomprehensible language and a…

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